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90 cases found
1866
Prof Thian CHEW; Ambrose TONG
Last update:
Number of Pages
Number of Pages Teaching Note
Complimentary Materials
Company
Pacific Coffee, China Resources Group
Industry
food and beverage
Discipline
Discipline
Accounting
Functional Area(s)
Pacific Coffee, Accounting, Finance, Business development, Business feasibility, Price comparison, Controllable versus uncontrollable variances, Business Uncertainties

Pacific Coffee operated several stores in Central Hong Kong, the heart of the city’s financial district. One of these stores (“Store X”) was situated on the ground floor and near the main lobby of a Grade A commercial building and a five-minute walk away from Lan Kwai Fong, a popular area for drinking, dining, and clubbing frequented by the city’s professionals. Store X’s opening hours were from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily. Profitability was constantly challenged by increased competition as well as pressures from cost inflation, including rent, labor, and raw material price increases. Jonathan Somerville, the group COO, had been contemplating a number of different strategies to optimize profitability at the store.

Two other related cases in this series include:

1. Pacific Coffee Balanced Scorecard: Operationalizing Strategies

2. Pacific Coffee: Long Run Investment Decisions

1867
Prof Thian CHEW; Ambrose TONG
Last update:
Number of Pages
Number of Pages Teaching Note
Complimentary Materials
Company
Pacific Coffee, China Resources Group
Industry
food and beverage
Discipline
Discipline
Accounting
Functional Area(s)
Pacific Coffee, Business development, Investment decision, Capital decisions, retailer chain , Competition, Marketing

Since China Resource Enterprise Ltd. (CRE) acquired a majority stake in Pacific Coffee in 2010, the coffee chain had experienced tremendous expansion particularly in mainland China. Yet, Hong Kong remained the core  of the business, and Pacific Coffee could not afford to lose its leadership position in its home base. The competitive environment became more intense and Hong Kong coffee consumers became more sophisticated.

Jonathan Somerville, the CEO, realized that while he needed to stay involved, and on top of the business in Hong Kong, he no longer had the capacity to be involved on a day-to-day basis. However, he needed to motivate his Hong Kong team and give them direction when implementing strategies. He decided the Balanced Business Scorecard would be an effective tool to link and align the company’s strategy to its operations.

Two other related cases in this series include:

1. Pacific Coffee: Making the Numbers Count

2. Pacific Coffee: Long Run Investment Decisions

1865
Prof Thian CHEW; Ambrose TONG
Last update:
Number of Pages
Number of Pages Teaching Note
Complimentary Materials
Company
Pacific Coffee, China Resources Group
Industry
food and beverage
Discipline
Discipline
Finance
Functional Area(s)
power structure, CEO transition, talent management, Leadership, promotion, Hiring, Business analytics, Entrenched power dynamics, regulatory framework

Pacific Coffee had experienced a major expansion of its network in Hong Kong since CRE took control in 2010. By March 2018, most but not all districts in Hong Kong had Pacific Coffee stores. Yet, with turnover in leases and new potential markets, there continued to be opportunities to expand into new store locations.

In March 2018, Pacific Coffee’s business development and leasing team found two locations up for rent. One was a ground-floor space at a new building on the campus of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), while the other option was a street-level store in Central district.

For Pacific Coffee’s management, the investment process did not entail just only financial return. Other intangible factors, such as brand building, were essential for the chain’s long-term growth strategy.

Two other related cases in this series include:

1. Pacific Coffee: Making the Numbers Count

2. Pacific Coffee Balanced Scorecard: Operationalizing Strategies

1760
Prof Jinyu HE; JP STEVENSON
Last update:
Number of Pages
17
Number of Pages Teaching Note
5
Complimentary Materials
Company
Nan Fung - the Mills
Industry
textile, exhibition and museum, community services
Discipline
Discipline
Entrepreneurship
Functional Area(s)

When the Hong Kong billion-dollar revitalization of a set of derelict cotton mills in Hong Kong was first conceptualized by property heiress Vanessa Cheung, the project had a clear direction around which it was to be oriented. The Mills was to be a social institution: a space in which an otherwise poor and fragmented local community could connect with both its past, as a center of textile production, and its future. Financed by Nan Fung Group, Vanessa’s multigenerational family business and one of Asia’s most valuable property development companies, the Mills was underwritten without the diligence that might proceed projects of a comparable scale. Three years from project inception but still several months away from the facilities opening to the public in late 2018, the Mills struggled to operationalize the three business models it had evolved to encompass, namely, an incubation platform including co-working space; shopping space targeting pop-up stores and smaller retailers; a heritage center to operate as a non-profit museum. Vanessa also wondered how her project will deliver on its original vision of creating shared value for its stakeholders.

1875
Prof Larence FRANKLIN; Kenny YIU
Last update:
Number of Pages
Number of Pages Teaching Note
Complimentary Materials
Presentation Slides
Company
Dalian Dexin Pharmaceutical Group (Fictitious)
Industry
Investing, chinese pharmaceuticals
Discipline
Discipline
Finance
Functional Area(s)

This case is intended to take students through the cycle of a direct investment, during which a number of decisions has to be made by the financial investor as the shareholder of the investee company. In a situation where the financial investor is a minority shareholder, it is of the investor’s best interest to be sensitive to the alignment of shareholders, especially with the controlling/strategic shareholder. When faced with a decision as to whether to maximize value for itself, or share value with the controlling/strategic shareholder, the financial investor should look harder to find creative solutions which can add value to both the minority and the controlling shareholder. Often times, additional investment means additional risk, and the then-current reward/risk balance should be carefully considered, including the then-current fundamentals of the investee company, and the competitive environment of the industry.

1874
Prof Suri GURUMURTHI; Prof Ronald LAU
Last update:
Number of Pages
15
Number of Pages Teaching Note
14
Complimentary Materials
Presentation Slides
Company
Esquel
Industry
Corporate Social Responsibility - CSR, E-Culture, Outsourcing, risk management, Project Management, Sustainability, Crisis Management, Ethics, risk management
Discipline
Discipline
Operations Management
Functional Area(s)
Culture, Sustainability Culture, Project Management, Corporate Social Responsibility, risk management, Crisis management, Ethical Leadership, Outsourcing, Vendor Management

The Esquel, one of the world’s largest cotton-based textile and apparel manufacturing companies, produces shirts for from scratch through a vertically integrated supply chain for many major brands, including Tommy Hilfiger, Hugo Boss, Ralph Lauren, Lacoste, and Nike, and department stores around the world. Its leadership, comprising Chairman Marjorie Yang, Vice Chairman Teresa Yang, and CEO John Cheh, had made significant strides over the past two decades, fostering and developing sustainability practices throughout their manufacturing network. Set during the summer of 2017, this case tracks their decision-making process during the development of a greenfield site in the city of Guilin in Guangxi Province, China. They named this greenfield site “Integral”, following the Buddhist concept of harmony between the natural and surrounding environment, the workplace and the workforce culture, and the pursuit of innovation, community, and excellence. The case explores the leadership and managerial crisis precipitated by technical problems discovered in the construction of the greenfield site. The company’s high standards and commitment to its 5E-Culture had clearly not translated to the ground operations at the project site, and Vice Chairman, Teresa Yang was tasked with guiding the project development through the crisis, and examining why the problems occurred in the first place.

1763
Prof Suri GURUMURTHI; Prof Ronald LAU
Last update:
Number of Pages
18
Number of Pages Teaching Note
18
Complimentary Materials
Company
Esquel
Industry
Sustainability, E-Culture, Corporate Social Responsibility - CSR, Blue Ocean, Vertical Integration, Private
Discipline
Discipline
Operations Management
Functional Area(s)
supply chain management, Operations Strategy, Sustainability Strategy, Corporate Social Responsibility, General Management, Vertical integration, Culture change, Value Innovation, Blue Ocean

The Esquel, one of the world’s largest cotton-based textile and apparel manufacturing companies, produces shirts for from scratch through a vertically integrated supply chain for many major brands, including Tommy Hilfiger, Hugo Boss, Ralph Lauren, Lacoste, and Nike, and department stores around the world. Its leadership, comprising Chairman Marjorie Yang, Vice Chairman Teresa Yang, and CEO John Cheh, had made significant strides over the past two decades, fostering and developing sustainability practices across their supply chain. Set in the early part of 2012, this case tracks their decision-making process as they saw an opportunity to develop a greenfield site in the city of Guilin in Guangxi Province, China. They named this new development project “Integral”, following the Buddhist concept of harmony between the natural and surrounding environment, the workplace and the workforce culture, and the pursuit of innovation, community, and excellence. The main issues the Esquel leadership faced were to define the vision and mission for Integral around the short and long-term value proposition of the Integral site. What could be the contribution of the Integral site to the Esquel network, and in what ways could they make the Integral site a showcase for the sustainability focus of the organization?

1754
Prof Kai-lung HUI; Prof Veronique LAFON-VINAIS; Dr Minyi HUANG
Last update:
Number of Pages
30
Number of Pages Teaching Note
12
Complimentary Materials
Company
300cubits.com
Industry
cargo shipping, fintech, cryptocurrency
Discipline
Discipline
Information Technology
Functional Area(s)
blockchain , financing strategies, Innovation, initial coin offering - ICO, cargo roll-over, cryptocurrency, Ethereum

300cubits is a blockchain application that aims to solve the no-show problem in the cargo shipping industry. Its founders, Johnson Leung and Jonathan Lee, are two HKUST alumni with experience in banking and shipping. They have identified a pain point, in the cargo shipping industry which does not require a pre-shipping cash deposit, results in no-show and cargo roll-over problems. They developed a new Ethereum based cryptocurrency, TEU, to serve as such collateral. They then conducted an initial coin offering (ICO) pre-sale in September 2017, and an official ICO in April 2018. However, the ICO failed to raise a lot of capital. However, the uptake of TEU tokens was very slow in the industry. They are now pondering the next steps forward.

1863
Prof Joon Nak CHOI; Marcella HO
Last update:
Number of Pages
Number of Pages Teaching Note
Complimentary Materials
Company
JT Fische - fictitious
Industry
investment banking
Discipline
Discipline
International Business
Functional Area(s)
Chinese business, grandxi, personal relationships, cultural issues, legal policy, opportunities and risks management, political connections, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act

Guanxi, political connections in China, can provide unique competitive advantages, but can expose business leaders to regulatory and political risks in the region. The fictional case focuses on how U.S. banks in Hong Kong, a major financial center for the Chinese market, are pinned upon the horns of a dilemma. Banks can abide by the letter of the law and not win any business; alternatively, they can break the law, in spirit if not actually the letter, and win business at the cost of incurring legal jeopardy and possibly violating one’s own sense of morality by hiring the children of well-connected senior management of a Chinese business who can direct substantial mandates to the employers.

 

1873
Prof Joon Nak CHOI; Marcella HO
Last update:
Number of Pages
Number of Pages Teaching Note
Complimentary Materials
Company
Samsung
Industry
Smartphones, Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Medical Devices
Discipline
Discipline
Strategy
Functional Area(s)
Asian Development Model, Silicon Valley, Innovation, fast follower strategy, global mangaement

To leverage the powerful innovation ecosystem found in Silicon Valley, Samsung has increasingly reoriented itself away from its Korean roots toward Silicon Valley–based subsidiaries such as the Samsung Strategic Innovation Center (SSIC). Like many other non-US-based technology companies, ranging from Nokia to Huawei, Samsung had long maintained a strong research and development presence in the Silicon Valley. Nonetheless, in recent years, Samsung has taken further steps, more than any other foreign company, aiming to become an authentic Silicon Valley entity. Today, Samsung has aspirations of becoming a top-five employer in the San Francisco Bay Area, building research and development centers in Mountain View and San Jose that are collectively half as large as Apple’s gargantuan new headquarters. The question for Samsung Electronics is how to leverage its existing capabilities in Korea and its new capabilities in Silicon Valley to achieve technological breakthroughs to continue to stay ahead of its Chinese competitors.